Czech government approves an increase in parental allowance

The Czech government has approved an increase in parental benefits, due to take effect from January 2020. In a press release from the Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs, it was announced this week that parents of newborns and children up to four years of age who have not yet exhausted their parental support will be eligible to receive additional financial help from January 1, 2020. The Czech government approved the proposal to increase the parental by 80,000 CZK to 300,000 CZK this week. The amendment has yet to be discussed by parliament and signed by the President. https://news.expats.cz/praguejobs/czech-government-to-substantially-increase-parental-leave-benefits/ Coalition parties have been debating the increase since last year with the proposal changing several times. Advocates of the amendment point out that family income drops significantly after the birth of a child. They say that while the cost of living is on the rise, the benefits have not been adjusted for years. https://twitter.com/JMalacova/status/1130461967322439680 However, some economists and experts on women's issues point out that while the Czech Republic may have significantly longer parental leave compared to foreign countries it also has low maternity employment. They say increasing the amount does not help get women back into the workforce. Part of…

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Prší, prší! 5 Czech idioms for heavy rainfall

In English, it's raining cats and dogs, or buckets of rain if you're a Dylan fan. What happens in the Czech language when a hard rain's a-gonna fall? It's raining as if from a pot. Venku lije jako z hrnce. It's raining as if from a watering can. Venku lije jako z konve. It's pissing and pissing. Chčije a chčije (Fans of the 1976 Czech film Na samotě u lesa will appreciate this one)! https://youtu.be/giFhuRI3j_0 It's raining as if from a water pipe. Venku lije jako z roury. It's raining wheelbarrows. Padají trakaře. https://news.expats.cz/weekly-czech-news/20-czech-expressions-for-when-youre-freezing-your-butt-off/ Misc. rain-related vocabulary Czechs even have a special verb moknout, or "to be out in the rain." In Czech, the verb rozpršet se: means “to begin to rain hard." When something begins to pop up uncontrollably, luxury condos, malls, for instance, this occurrence can be described in Czech as "springing up like mushrooms after the rain" (Rostou nám tak jako houby po dešti).

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Prague’s next David Černý sculpture is coming to Karlín
Visualization via Qwarta Arkitektura

Prague’s next David Černý sculpture is coming to Karlín

From a rotating Kafka head to his signature alien babies (recently returned to their home on the Žižkov Tower) the works of Czech artist David Černý are an integral part of the Prague cityscape. A new Černý project is slated to make its debut, according to the new issue of Prague 8 newsletter Osmička. The Nová Invalidovna project, a residential building slated for construction next spring, will feature a larger-than-life Černý sculpture hugging its modern facade. Visualization via Qwarta Arkitektura The property will offer apartments, underground parking, and a courtyard on the ground floor with a fitness center, cafes, and drugstores. The construction should kick off in the second half of 2022. Trigema is the investor and developer of the Nová Invalidovna project with architectural work provided by Qarta Architecture.  In 2016, the Czech artist-provocateur unveiled a towering robot for the opening of the Czech Photo Centre, a museum in Nové Butovice showcasing the work of leading Czech and international photographers. Černý’s latest endeavor, a two-floor restaurant called Cyberdog, opened in Prague in 2018, and is serviced by Europe’s first robotic bartender.

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Bloomberg: Czech economy among the world’s “least miserable”

The annual Bloomberg Misery Index is intended to illustrate the concept that low inflation and unemployment can impact how good a nation's citizens feel. Going by these criteria it seems the inhabitants of the Czech lands should be happier -- or at least less miserable -- than a number of other countries. According to the Index, the top five countries with the least miserable economies are 1) Thailand, 2) Switzerland, 3) Japan and Singapore, 4) Taiwan and 5) Malaysia. https://news.expats.cz/praguejobs/czech-republic-at-the-low-end-of-eu-minimum-wage-ranking/ The Czech Republic ranked sixth, followed by Hong Kong, Isreal, South Korea, and Ecuador rounding out the top ten. The index is calculated as the "sum of a country’s inflation and unemployment rates" that compares the median estimate of economists’ forecasts for each country’s rates in 2019 to 2018 published data. https://news.expats.cz/praguejobs/the-czech-unemployment-rate-is-now-the-lowest-ever-recorded-in-the-eu/ This year’s scores are based on Bloomberg economists’ surveys, while prior years reflected actual data. At the "most miserable" end of the spectrum, Venezuela is the world's most miserable economy followed by Argentina, South Africa, Turkey, and Greece.

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