Face masks mandatory at all indoor locations across the Czech Republic from tomorrow, says Health Minister

Adam Vojtěch has tweeted that masks will become mandatory at additional locations from tomorrow; further details to come

Jason Pirodsky

Written by Jason Pirodsky
Published on 09.09.2020 11:25 (updated on 09.09.2020)

In the ever-developing saga involving wearing face masks in the Czech Republic, Health Minister Adam Vojtěch has tweeted that they will become mandatory at indoor locations across the country from tomorrow, September 10.

Further details will be released later today, Vojtěch stated.

“Due to the worsening epidemiological situation, I have called an emergency meeting of the Smart Quarantine Central Control Team for this morning,” the Health Minister writes.

“We have agreed with experts to introduce the requirement to wear face masks in interior spaces of buildings across the Czech Republic as of tomorrow.”

At a later video conference with journalists, Vojtěch clarified that somewhat. Masks will be required at indoor locations including offices, with some exceptions. One exception would be if you work at a desk and maintain at least two meters distance from others; another is in school classrooms, though masks will need to be worn in other areas of schools.

Masks also won’t be required while eating or drinking, nor for athletes while training.

“The rule is that face masks will be worn indoors, not outside, with clearly defined exceptions.”

Those exceptions will presumably be defined by the Czech Health Ministry later today.

Currently, face masks are mandatory in the Czech Republic on public transport vehicles, health and social care facilities, public offices, and indoor events with more than 100 people.

In Prague, due to the worsening COVID-19 situation, face masks are also required from today at additional locations including shops, shopping malls, and common spaces in schools (but not classrooms).

Yesterday, the Czech Republic set a new record high for the daily increase in COVID-19 cases at 1,164. There are 234 people hospitalized with COVID-19 in the Czech Republic, with 62 considered to be in serious condition.

Two days later, he walked back those statements following objections by Prime Minister Andrej Babiš, easing the mask requirements to their current form.

Since then, the Czech Republic has become one of the most-affected countries in the EU. Only Spain, France, Romania, Croatia, and Malta have recorded more COVID-19 cases per 100,000 residents over the past 14 days.

This is a developing story; will will update with additional information as it is made available.