Prague’s next David Černý sculpture is coming to Karlín
Visualization via Qwarta Arkitektura

Prague’s next David Černý sculpture is coming to Karlín

From a rotating Kafka head to his signature alien babies (recently returned to their home on the Žižkov Tower) the works of Czech artist David Černý are an integral part of the Prague cityscape. A new Černý project is slated to make its debut, according to the new issue of Prague 8 newsletter Osmička. The Nová Invalidovna project, a residential building slated for construction next spring, will feature a larger-than-life Černý sculpture hugging its modern facade. Visualization via Qwarta Arkitektura The property will offer apartments, underground parking, and a courtyard on the ground floor with a fitness center, cafes, and drugstores. The construction should kick off in the second half of 2022. Trigema is the investor and developer of the Nová Invalidovna project with architectural work provided by Qarta Architecture.  In 2016, the Czech artist-provocateur unveiled a towering robot for the opening of the Czech Photo Centre, a museum in Nové Butovice showcasing the work of leading Czech and international photographers. Černý’s latest endeavor, a two-floor restaurant called Cyberdog, opened in Prague in 2018, and is serviced by Europe’s first robotic bartender.

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Bloomberg: Czech economy among the world’s “least miserable”

The annual Bloomberg Misery Index is intended to illustrate the concept that low inflation and unemployment can impact how good a nation's citizens feel. Going by these criteria it seems the inhabitants of the Czech lands should be happier -- or at least less miserable -- than a number of other countries. According to the Index, the top five countries with the least miserable economies are 1) Thailand, 2) Switzerland, 3) Japan and Singapore, 4) Taiwan and 5) Malaysia. https://news.expats.cz/praguejobs/czech-republic-at-the-low-end-of-eu-minimum-wage-ranking/ The Czech Republic ranked sixth, followed by Hong Kong, Isreal, South Korea, and Ecuador rounding out the top ten. The index is calculated as the "sum of a country’s inflation and unemployment rates" that compares the median estimate of economists’ forecasts for each country’s rates in 2019 to 2018 published data. https://news.expats.cz/praguejobs/the-czech-unemployment-rate-is-now-the-lowest-ever-recorded-in-the-eu/ This year’s scores are based on Bloomberg economists’ surveys, while prior years reflected actual data. At the "most miserable" end of the spectrum, Venezuela is the world's most miserable economy followed by Argentina, South Africa, Turkey, and Greece.

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